Meeting Register Page

Rachel Williams - Chartering Exploitation: 21st Century Black Schooling and the (Re)making of a Southern City
In this discussion, Rachel Williams draws upon qualitative and spatial methods to examine how new modes of segregation, such as exploitative housing policies and county secession, shape the trajectory of charter growth from 2002 to 2021 in Memphis, Tennessee, a majority Black city following the post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans model. By exploring the present-day implications of Jim Crow era segregation, education policy, and unequal political and economic power, this case study explores the local processes shaping how charters take root in new places, while illuminating the structural conditions shaping Black politics in a majority Black city in the U.S. South.

Rachel Elizabeth Williams is a PhD candidate in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research agenda explores the linkages between the political economy, segregation, education policy, and Black intra-racial politics. In her dissertation, she utilizes qualitative and spatial methods to examine charter growth in relationship to new modes of segregation, such as predatory housing policies and county secession, while drawing linkages to Black politics in a majority Black city in the U.S. South.

Email EPS@education.wisc.edu if you have any questions.

Oct 22, 2021 12:00 PM in Central Time (US and Canada)

Loading
* Required information